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Gaming & Media => Gaming & Media => Topic started by: Spunky on August 04, 2006, 01:36:00 pm

Title: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Spunky on August 04, 2006, 01:36:00 pm
Does anyone here play D&D? The roleplay dice throwing game? Just curious before i start a conversation about it.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Lexx on August 04, 2006, 02:39:22 pm
I have.. not recently though.

The game I was in kinda dissolved when the DM had a mental breakdown.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Asor on August 04, 2006, 04:50:43 pm
I havent played, but recently my friend bought the D&D dices and downloaded some manuals "just for fun", dunno what will it end to be but im pretty sure we will get atleast to the point we make characters. And I'm pretty sure that it is just matter of the fact that the person who bought the dices isn't very comfortable around people... Sooo we will see
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Spunky on August 04, 2006, 05:24:03 pm
If you get stuck on character creation, this (http://www.pathguy.com/cg35.htm) might help you :)
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Lexx on August 04, 2006, 05:28:47 pm
Character creation is easy; Roguerogueroguerogue.


Rehevkor,
Rogue.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: L'homme magique on August 04, 2006, 08:57:33 pm
Bard is the Way to Go.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Gyokuro on August 04, 2006, 09:26:44 pm
Yep, played it few times with my friends...
I think they still play it, I'm gonna "quit" it, since I'm gonna move to another city.
I'll prob. play it again if I can find a group of new friends around there to play it with...
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: -File_not_Found- on August 04, 2006, 09:36:09 pm
I play a Ranger with dueling pistols in a pirate campaign were running, it is fucking awesome. I love Dungeons and Dragons. :)
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: MDX on August 04, 2006, 09:46:54 pm
What do you think TREZKER?!
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Bearfoot on August 04, 2006, 11:11:13 pm
Been part of a regular group sence.. *counts on his fingers*  90 or so...

been playing sence I was 12...
(I'm 30)

why do you ask?
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Armakuni on August 04, 2006, 11:11:58 pm
Yeah i play : www.dndglory.cjb.net
My brother is the DM its been around for some time now :)


Anyways, didnt i ask this question once? wait i know i did ;)
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Bearfoot on August 04, 2006, 11:20:19 pm
Tell yoru brother to take out the embeded musidc or I'll travel around the world to chastise him bout bad web design
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Armakuni on August 04, 2006, 11:23:50 pm
since he is my brother i say : Fuck you!, i never bad mouth your family right?
and its meant to be crap.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: not12x on August 05, 2006, 01:02:06 am
Ive been playing since i was 11, and i'm 17.   I play in two home campaigns, two RPGA living campaigns, and i'm looking to start an online game.

Going to Gencon Indy in 6 days.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Jack Lupino on August 05, 2006, 01:43:30 am
Character creation is easy; Roguerogueroguerogue.


Rehevkor,
Rogue.
Zealot, prepare to be smitten.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Smeagol on August 05, 2006, 01:52:48 am
Bard is the Way to Go.

No, Fighter.

Playing Operation: Meatshield is fun from the word go!
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Spiff on August 05, 2006, 02:45:07 am
since he is my brother i say : Fuck you!, i never bad mouth your family right?
and its meant to be crap.
He wasn't "badmouthing your family", unless you can't tell the difference between your brother and a website. :P

Only played D&D twice. We gave up on it because we weren't really roleplaying at all, and the quests we did felt more like grinding. I'm sure it could be fun with good quests to get immersed in, when you care more for your character.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: L'homme magique on August 05, 2006, 06:34:56 am
Quote

No, Fighter.
No, Bard.

Also: "it's meant to be crap" is the excuse used by people who are shit at things, and know it.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Bearfoot on August 05, 2006, 06:47:55 am
Quote

No, Fighter.
No, Bard.

Also: "it's meant to be crap" is the excuse used by people who are shit at things, and know it.

I agree.. our bard just made it so that 3 12th level characters took down a adult red dragon without reprisal.. none of them fighters...

the look on the DM's face was amazingly worth it.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: not12x on August 05, 2006, 11:17:10 am
meh.  how about a second level wizard single handedly defeating fifteen huge air elementals with one spell?

:D gotta love Wall of Thought

Anyways, anyone up for making an online campaign?  I'd dm, though i'd prefer to play.

btw, I have a penis.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Spunky on August 05, 2006, 12:00:02 pm
Ace, i didn't know if there would be any DnD'ers on the board :) Was just asking cause Akakori and me (plus many friends) are about to start playing it. You are all now a base for our questions like, HOW DOES EXPERIENCE WORK?!
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Laser.T on August 05, 2006, 12:38:13 pm
There isn't a question that cannot be anwered by spending 14 days and nights reading through all three core rulebooks. >.<
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: MDX on August 05, 2006, 03:38:49 pm
Character creation is easy; Roguerogueroguerogue.


Rehevkor,
Rogue.

That my friend, is hot.

Rogues are the way to go. lvlpls? i dont even play it atm until i have a new computer. but yeah, i kinda love rogues, but i might become a warrior, i dunno.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Jack Lupino on August 05, 2006, 05:53:20 pm
HOW ABOUT A DOOMSAYER

You get to rollplay.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Trezker on August 05, 2006, 06:07:45 pm
What do you think TREZKER?!
I don't know all about D&D professions...

But I've been playing Titan Quest a lot lately.
Rogue was damn fun the first time around, but at higher difficulty he just can't stay alive.

Then I made it around with a stormcaster, Ice Shards all the way. Monsters rarely reached me alive.
But at higher difficulty the lack of defence will probably suck.

Now I'm working on a defender, maxing defence, resistance and retaliation. I wonder how that goes.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Jack Lupino on August 05, 2006, 06:15:38 pm
Enter diablo.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Bearfoot on August 05, 2006, 07:45:15 pm
Ace, i didn't know if there would be any DnD'ers on the board :) Was just asking cause Akakori and me (plus many friends) are about to start playing it. You are all now a base for our questions like, HOW DOES EXPERIENCE WORK?!

Get DnD for dummies and DMing for dummies.

they're real books and good ones.  Worth the investment even for someone who's been playng third edition literally sence it came out.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: MDX on August 05, 2006, 07:46:08 pm
What do you think TREZKER?!
I don't know all about D&D professions...

But I've been playing Titan Quest a lot lately.
Rogue was damn fun the first time around, but at higher difficulty he just can't stay alive.

Then I made it around with a stormcaster, Ice Shards all the way. Monsters rarely reached me alive.
But at higher difficulty the lack of defence will probably suck.

Now I'm working on a defender, maxing defence, resistance and retaliation. I wonder how that goes.

I only asked cuz i saw you in the thread "viewing" :(
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: L'homme magique on August 05, 2006, 08:46:47 pm
Quote
But I've been playing Titan Quest a lot lately.
What a waste of time.

Erin: I'd be up for it. I haven't played a real game of D&D in so long, though.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Bearfoot on August 05, 2006, 09:30:28 pm
Also I want to play a favored soul sometime.. (A cleric who casts spells like a sorcerer.)
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: PrescriptiveBarony on August 05, 2006, 10:04:02 pm
What a waste of time.

Quote from: Stats
Time Spent Online: 13d 2h 27m
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Bates on August 05, 2006, 10:06:59 pm
That implies the time is spent solely on the forums. But thanks to multitasking, you can do other things while browsing machinae forums. Like doing stuff.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: PrescriptiveBarony on August 05, 2006, 10:17:41 pm
but the forums are pretty good at knowing when you're not doing anything. you can't just leave a window open and rack up teh minutes.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Bates on August 05, 2006, 10:35:43 pm
You just have to do something every ten minutes = instant forum time win.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: CrunchyLizard on August 05, 2006, 10:39:49 pm
You just have to do something every ten minutes = instant forum time win.

Which makes me notice that my online time has just passed 8 days without me noticing before now.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Bearfoot on August 05, 2006, 10:54:24 pm
Guys.. wer'e drifting OT here....
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Asor on August 05, 2006, 11:31:22 pm
Guys.. wer'e drifting OT here....
Holy macaroni, batman! I sense large quantities of off-topicness in the MaSu forums!

But yes, anyways I think(just fooling ya, I know im gonna) im gonna be a sorcerer. Sorcerers are teh cool, even tho they dont get as many spells as wizards but casting spells when ye wanna is teh hawt.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: -File_not_Found- on August 06, 2006, 12:10:00 am
Asor, you better invest your earlier level spells in sleep and color sprays....color spray is teh godxorrr!
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Bearfoot on August 06, 2006, 01:09:48 am
Best low level spell.. Sleep.

Why?  Three little words "Coupe de grace"

at low levels even if they somehow manage to make the save, the HP damage usually does him in.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: not12x on August 07, 2006, 01:20:57 am
best low level spell?
Wall Of Thought.

Its a wall of force, for a level 2 caster.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Bearfoot on August 07, 2006, 02:23:19 am
Don't forget the "Buff spells" too.. the key to gaining power as a MU (Magic user) is to survive th eearly levels.. :)
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Einkoro on August 07, 2006, 06:48:14 am
Where is the mountain dew?
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Caranfin on August 07, 2006, 01:31:03 pm
I've played pen&paper RPGs since I was eleven or so, that's about five years. It started when my father gave me the MERP (Middle-Earth Role Playing game) rulebook as a christmas present, I got a few of my friends interested quite fast. After that I've played first Rolemaster and then D&D, also a bit of Traveller, with a lot of gropus, all of the time as a DM, except in D&D. In the later games of Rolemaster I had ditched quite a lot of the critical tables and other stuff and D&D felt like a very good system. Of course, I never DMed a D&D campaign so I really don't know how it is from the DM's point of view.

A while ago I started creating my own rules since I got bored with hitpoints. Sure, the fighting in D&D can be very interesting and detailed if the DM knows his stuff but, especially when everyone is tired or the DM isn't very experienced, it easily reverts to the point where the fights are something like this:

DM:"Ok, so there's an orc, right? He's got a large sword and he's coming at you. What do you do?"
Player:"Umm... I guess I'll hit him with my sword." *rolls dice*
DM:"Right." *mumbling about hitpoints, making a few notes on a paper* "'kay, then he hits you with his sword." *rolls dice*
and so forth...

Well, you get my point. That's just two people whacking each other with swords until one of them gets enough wounds to go unconscious or die. I thought that was stupid, who the hell is able to continue fighting after someone has landed a good blow on them with something quite large, heavy, sharp, and possibly spiky? Come to think of it, who the hell continues fighting after someone has stabbed them with an ordinary dagger?

In my system the fighting is more focused on the point before the actual hit; if the target has time to react, if he blocks or dodges the attack, if he has time to counterattack, etc. And most importantly: How he does it. When someone actually gets a hit through the DM decides on the effects based on the attacker's and defender's rolls and the weapon and armour used.

Here's part of a fight from a campaign I'm DMing with my rules currently. The player is mainly an archer but has a bit of experience using a sword, wearing no armour. The enemy is a pure fighter with an one handed sword and a shield, wearing short chainmail.

DM:*rolls dice for reaction* "He comes at you shield up and sword raised, apparently going for a vertical swipe to the top of your head."
Player:"I dodge to his shield-hand side and kick his shield to try to get him out of balance."
DM:*rolls dice* "You dodge too early. He sees your movement, stops the swing and hits you with his shield before you get the chance kick. The cold, hard, metal of the shield comes right at your face, there's a blinding pain between your eyes and you feel your nose go "crack". You notice the blurred shape that is your enemy raising his sword to hit you diagonally from your left to your right."
Player:"I try to clear my head and try to hit his sword from left so that his swing misses me."

The fight continued like that for a while; the player stumbling backwards trying to clear his head and desperately blocking the enemy's attacks, then he caught his leg on a stone and fell on his back, dodged a swing by rolling on the ground and while rolling got a very lucky hit on the enemy's sword-hand's bicep. That got him enough time to get up and the wound was bad enough to make the enemy's fighting very painful. The player pushed the enemy backwards for a short time and finally managed to tackle the enemy down a cliff.

The rules are, of course, not perfect. And not nearly finished. I've yet to completely decide on the dice used to get a good balance between the skill of the characters and luck and other things, but we're testing them and the players are liking them very much. I've also in the process of creating a new fantasy world to play in. That will, however, take quite a while still since I feel like doing it properly.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Spunky on August 07, 2006, 01:56:53 pm
That sounds liek an excellent view of combat in my opinion. Its how i see how it works and its how i like to think it works. Even in WoW i don't see hit points as health. i see it as like, endurence in a fight. When you run out of energy, you simply cannot block, dodge or do anything to stop soemone hitting/killing you.

Since this has generated alot of interest (which surpises me!) i was wondering if you could give any advice or tips for first time players of the v3.5 D&D ruleset?
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Jack Lupino on August 07, 2006, 05:04:45 pm
NOO TOXIC BOMB TRAP +5 !!


*farts*



" Dude  WHAT THE FYCJ"
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: evilcandybag on August 10, 2006, 12:37:04 am
I don't really like the D20 system. There are so many better systems for fantasy role playing, such as Eon (Swedish), which, among other things, replaces the boring HP with cool stuff such as Damage Levels, Trauma Values and Death Rolls.
The idea of a set number of spells per day seems strange to me, too. I much more prefer systems that use physical drain to fuel spells, such as Shadowrun.

Despite the fact that I dislike the system, I play a lot of Star Wars D20. I think D20 is way better in it's Star Wars adapted version.

When I do play DnD, I usually play multiclass characters with some fighting class such as monk, fighter or barbarianwith sorcerer, the fighting classes most often being the main class.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Ant on April 20, 2007, 07:02:34 pm
*Resurrection spell level 5 etc.*

when Caranfin finishes this system, i'd like to hear from him, for sure
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Sirix on April 20, 2007, 07:26:41 pm
my friends and I have been playing D&D since we were 12.
i'm going to be 21 soon.

we only ever played 1 or 2 sessions of D20 an decided we didn't like it.
we've slowly developed and perfected our own system over the years.

it's mostly a "judge on the spot" system.

one of our iterations lasted 5 years.  We called it "Soul DND"

One that we play on occasion now (we're all split up now because of university) is called "God DND"
we are avatars of gods.  There are 8 different ones, all in their own domains.
within that domain, you can create -any- skill you want depending on how many "skill slots" you have (you gain 1 per level).  The player chooses every detail about the skill, then the DM assigns how much MP it will cost.   This makes it easy to stop players from creating uber skills, since if they make it too strong the DM can make it cost hundreds or thousands of MP and so the player won't even be able to cast it at their current level.
it's a huge power trip of a DND, and whoever DMs usualy tries to aim to kill the players, since the players can haul a skill out of the blue and really trump the DMs monsters/rivals.

It's very easy to DM and very easy to introduce new players to.

my favourite character was an avatar of the God of Nature.
He was a humanoid bird with a body entwined in roots.
he used a chinese sword (like Xianghua from soul calibur) and I made him learn abilities to enhance the entire party.

it has a lot of freedom in creativity.. encourages creativity like crazy.

we don't use a grid system, but just go by memory and honor system... generally if we seem someone isn't being "honorable" in where he/she was last, we'll repremand him/her... but it doesn't happen often.
taking out the grid system makes for very fast paced battles...

anyway, yeah.
bam.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: evilcandybag on April 21, 2007, 12:54:14 am
I recently played the Swedish created RPG "Western" with some friends. The rule system is very interesting, especially the way hits are handled. You have a crosshair template that you place on another template shaped as your target (dude, dude on horse and so on). The higher your to hit roll, the closer to the middle you hit. This makes for very realistic gunfights, and makes it much easier to calculate collateral damage, since you know exactly where all stray bullets end up.
It is, like all Swedish RPGs, not entirely thought through in places. For example, the max range to throw a dynamite stick is 60 meters. If you follow the to hit rules by the letter, it is possible to miss your mark with as much as 50 meters, meaning if you aim ten meters in front of you, your stick may very well end up behind you or on the other side of a house.

I also like the wild west setting, since everybody knows what it is. You dont need to explain how the elves are in this fantasy world or how proto-laser propulsion is the most important aspect of your sci fi universe.
You just say "We're playing in the wild west" and then everybody knows what to expect. One other thing is that it's easier to get a collective vision of things if you have a good foundation to work from.
Did I mention that the gunslinger is probably the coolest thing that will ever be invented in the US?

Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Torp v2.0 on April 24, 2007, 04:20:03 pm
I'm no fan of the D&D system either, though with a good GM, any system can work. I had some fun in the army, playing D&D, with Talhoffer, actually.

I currently play in two rpg groups, and I'm joining a third this week. There's one game of Exalted, which I find very enjoyable. It's the best campaign I've played in, for sure. It helps that I have a well fleshed out character who catches my interest, and tend to get good amounts of screen time (She can be found here (http://web48.server-drome.org/rpg-tr/wiki/index.php/Alkippe), if anyone felt curious). It's not very combat-oriented, at least not in the physical sense (social combat rules!), and so it really does focus on the roleplaying aspect of RPGing. Last session mostly consisted of me and the two other players showing up having a discussion with a NPC controlled by the GMs visiting friend. Not a single blow was struck, though we did go into social combat (and I got yet another 3 dice stunt, for those who know the system - that is, by the way, a great thing with the system - it awards cool descriptions of actions, so that actually playing out your argument nets you a bonus in convincing opponents that you're right).

The other one is an Ars Magica game, affectionately known as "Fredagsspising" (spising = eating, spilling = gaming). We don't always end up gaming there, but we always have a very good meal. I love that group.

The last group, which I'm about to join, is a RuneQuest game. I don't know how that will turn out, but I suspect it will be fun.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: evilcandybag on April 24, 2007, 07:49:10 pm
I'm not a big fan of the Exalted (and thus WW) rules, mostly due to very imbalanced attributes. In combat, it's basically a matter of who has the highest Dexterity (or whatever it's called). All other attributes used in combat are vastly inferior. I created a character for a rather combat oriented campaign whose best attribute was Fortitude (or stammina or whatever). Needless to say, I got my arse kicked bigtime, due to the enemy's slightly higher Dex (both my Strength and Fort attributes were much higher).
Needless to say, that sucked bigtime.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Torp v2.0 on April 24, 2007, 08:02:15 pm
Yeah, but Dex is only that important if the game focuses on combat. A good RPG does not focus on combat. Combat can be fun, but the other aspects are generally more so, at least if the GM is any good.

Plus, my GM has realised the importance of Dex in combat, and has therefore increased the XP cost of it. In our campaign, Dex costs 1,5 times as much as other attributes to raise (and because we started with a point-buy system rather than the normal WW character creation system, this also affected character creation).

Also, in Exalted, your Dex wouldn't count as much as in other WW games, because it won't be contributing as much to your dicepool.

I'm not saying Storyteller is the best system out there, it's not. But it's way better than D20. And if D20 can be made fun by a good GM (thumbs up for Tal), then Storyteller-system-based games most definitely can. And Exalted have a couple of very nice mechanics that I'd like to see in other games - among them the stunt bonus - a mechanical bonus for describing your actions.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Trias on April 25, 2007, 12:21:09 am
care to elaborate how that works in detail?
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Torp v2.0 on April 25, 2007, 01:22:00 am
Sure. You describe your action, and the storyteller applies a "stunt bonus" of between 1 and 3 dice, depending on how evocative and "cool" your description was). In combat, the guidelines state that a 1 die stunt requires a good description of the action. A 2 dice stunt should incorporate interaction with the environment, which for the sake of the game includes "extras" (characters of little to no importance, like basic enemy soldiers). 3 dice stunts, in all incarnations, can be summed up in a single sentence: If there's any doubt whether or not it's a 3 dice stunt, it's not. They're singular acts of greatness, really evocative actions. If it was a combat move, and you'd put it into a movie, it would rival the coolness factor of the best scenes in any action-oriented anime, or the Matrix or whatever (Exalted is heavily influenced by anime and that kind of stuff, so anime-like actions are the norm).

In addition to adding dice, a stunt will also allow you to do actions that would normally be considered impossible, and do minor scene editing (like adding a chandelier to the room you're in so you can swing over to the Big Bad Evil Guy in a fancy pirate-y move skewering him on your sword). A successful stunt also makes the character who stunted regain a bit of Essence (magic power which all Exalted have), a point of Willpower (2 dice stunts will give the character 1 point of WP or 4 Essence, 1 die stunts will only give 2 points of Essence), or in the case of 3 dice stunts, give them a point of XP.

Examples...sure, I'll give a couple.

1-die:
"I stab forward with my spear, catching a soldier right in the chest, rip it out of him and swing it around in a semicircle, cutting the throat of another soldier"

"As the sword comes down towards me, disarmed and unarmoured, I clasp my hands above my head, praying to the gods that I'll be able to catch the sword between my palms" - defensive stunt, and would allow you to use your parry instead of your dodge despite being without weapons to parry with.

2-dice:
"I can almost feel my pursuers breath upon my neck as I twist around a corner into a small alley, jumping against one wall and then another to gain leverage, turning in midair. While he might suspect some trickery, he is not prepared for the three daggers flying down towards him from above." - creates an alley for the character to run into. In Exalted, wall-jumping is no problem even without a stunt.

3-dice:
"As he stands there, back towards me, I grab a hold of the rope holding the chandelier up, and cut the rope with a swipe from my sword. I'm jerked from the ground, thrown upwards and forwards. The flight leads me towards the Dragon-blooded*, and as the chandelier crashes down onto his soldiers, he turns. I catch a glimmer of surprise in his eyes as he sees me descending upon him like a Fury from the legends, sword like a vicious talon rending into his flesh."

*Dragon-blooded are a sort of Exalt in Exalted.

Had I had acopy of the Matrix or something lying around, I'd use some of Neos tricks in that movie to exemplify the different levels of stunts.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Lysix on April 25, 2007, 02:09:04 am
wow, this is pure concentrated nerd speak!
QUICK, SOMEONE FIND ME A JAR!  [:

D&D has temped me once in a while, but i always got put off with the mass of text and numbers you gotta keep a track of :(
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Torp v2.0 on April 25, 2007, 02:13:57 am
Yes. What did you expect in a thread with the subject this one has? Non-geek-ness? :P
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Lysix on April 25, 2007, 02:33:06 am
Very true. :P
That D&D MMO, is that any good? I mean, in relation to the text based stuff?
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Trias on April 25, 2007, 10:40:44 am
thanks, Torp, for the explanation.

Don't know if I'd like that kind of game. Doesn't that lead to constant super-hero action? What if you want to play a character that's not very dexterous, but rather the intelligent dorky kind of guy?
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Torp v2.0 on April 25, 2007, 12:39:57 pm
Well, any action that requires a dice roll, from normal to social combat to perception rolls and research, can be stunted. I merely chose to exemplify combat because that's the easiest part to make up evocative descriptions on the spot. One of our characters more or less suck in combat*, but he's a smart guy and can do some neat stuff outside of it.

In Exalted, all player characters are "superheroes", though. The concept of the game is that the PCs were heroic mortals who got chosen by one of the celestial gods and infused with power and near-immortality. Each character is a demigod and an expert in his field (the character who is not very good at combat is an expert in knowledge and occult, and know sorcery (which is pretty useless in normal combat due to the long casting time)).

*For an exalted, at least. He's still able to beat non-supernaturals easily, I would suspect.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Trias on April 25, 2007, 01:53:27 pm
ah, I see. :)

Part of my discomfort is probably that I, too, feel not geeky enough to give such deliberately 'cool' descriptions all the time... well, haven't tried it, maybe it's fun.

I mean I've always been interested in RPGs, including great atmosphere and story, but never really got into hardcore roleplaying in the literal sense, I think.

EDIT: Or let's phrase it this way: I like my character to act in a atmospheric way, but it still feels awkward to describe it...
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Torp v2.0 on April 25, 2007, 02:36:27 pm
A lot of things feel akward and weird at first. Many of these things are, once you learn to overcome your awkwardness, really fun.

I'm not just talking about RPG mechanics, here. That's a truth for a whole lot of aspects of life.

When it comes to roleplaying, the best advice I can give is to let go and ignore the awkwardness. Believe me, I've come into situations that have felt awkward while gaming, but those times when I ignored it and went with the flow, went with how I imagined my character would react, it has generally meant a better gaming experience. Can't remember an occasion where it destroyed the experience.
Title: Re: Dungeons & Dragons
Post by: Lysix on April 25, 2007, 03:01:36 pm
"As my enemy gallops towards me on horseback, i cannot help but pass wind quite loudly" :P