Author Topic: Rise of a Digital Nation: Reviews  (Read 9637 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline OmegaVesko

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 150
  • Karma: 3
    • Gamers' Abode
Re: Rise of a Digital Nation: Reviews
« Reply #15 on: October 30, 2012, 12:23:14 am »
http://www.stalker.cd/index.php?lang=2&content=62&kat=cd&id=2415

"However, I am surprised that I cannot find a keyboarder in the band line-up?"

If I got a penny every time I heard that, I'd be rich.

Offline robert

  • Baka
  • Band Member
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1634
  • Karma: 230
  • Gender: Male
  • \,,/_(o-O)_,,i,.
    • Machinae Supremacy
Re: Rise of a Digital Nation: Reviews
« Reply #16 on: October 31, 2012, 09:30:49 pm »
We'll just have to put "Zeke" on keyboards then. :)


It's my job to keep SID elite.

---

<WereVolvo> you can't brain today, you have the dumb?

Offline evilcandybag

  • of Fire
  • Global Moderator
  • Machinae Prime
  • *****
  • Posts: 3152
  • Karma: 66
  • Gender: Male
  • Armoured Tanks of Mass Destruction
Re: Rise of a Digital Nation: Reviews
« Reply #17 on: October 31, 2012, 11:53:33 pm »
He would be the best keyboardist ever.
"Actually, wooden stakes are for vampires. Wooden steaks are for vegetarians."

Offline Crazywater

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 962
  • Karma: 6
Re: Rise of a Digital Nation: Reviews
« Reply #18 on: November 05, 2012, 06:07:16 pm »
Found this one on http://www.metal.de/heavy-metal/review/machinae-supremacy/51904-rise-of-a-digital-nation/:

Machinae Supremacy deserve the cult status they enjoy. Not only because of their incredible "Giana Sisters" version that made the band legendary since a time ago that feels like ages, but also because they were one of the first bands who shared their professionally produced music online for free. In doing this, they were ahead of the clearly Janus-faced pirate Julia Schramm [German pirate party member who didn't want her biography to be shared online] in many ways even years ago.

But these times are over. Already since 2006, Machinae Supremacy release their music totally un-rebelliously via Spinefarm Records, and it isn't for free anymore either. "Rise Of A Digital Nation" is already the fourth label-directed album appearing in the usual two-year cycle. And more and more, it's time to say that as cool as the SID chip of the sacred C64 sounds even over 30 years after its development, and as great as it fits into the composition of technically sophisticated Modern/Heavy Metal songs - slowly the attractivity of this mixture of style is wearing off. "Rise of a Digital Nation" is a downright classical Machinae Supremacy album: Ten rather uniform, entertaining songs, very guitar-based and in that aspect enormously sophisticated. The drums are groovy and paced in a dashing mid-tempo, on top of that Robert Stjärnström's very unique, clean singing voice. The latter appears on this fourth album as surprisingly one-dimensional and in my opinion as not biting enough. Especially in a very successful groove-monster like "Transgenic" one would wish for a bit more variation.

The usage of the SID chipsound, cut back significantly on the previous album "A View From The End Of The World" in comparison to earlier songs, gets more room here, for example in the especially during the chorus slightly Green Day-like "Pieces", in which the SID leads the song and accompanies the listener acoustically through an exciting imaginary Level. Of a similar caliber is the following "Republic of Gamers", which develops out of the industrial prelude "Cyber Warfare" into a typical Machinae Supremacy song. "99" starts out pretty "Last Ninja"-esque (very cool!) and unfortunately remains pretty pale otherwise - in contrast to the strong final song "Hero".

Therein manifests the varying, but still above average quality of "Rise Of The[sic] Digital Nation". That does have a negative side: The disc contains neither surprises nor real hits, no single outstanding song, but just ten solid tracks of which at least three (funnily enough during the first half) are not necessary at all. The conceptional side of the album could be interesting as well, everything between a critique of the progressing digitalization of our society to the call for unity among Gamers of all nations is possible, in theory. Especially, if one doesn't know the lyrics, like me. But you don't need to, the album is enough fun even if you're fully ignorant.

7/10
We're open to such things, we've even talked many times about doing it with Inja, but in a way that's redundant because we can already get Erica
:o brown chicken brown cow :o

Offline robert

  • Baka
  • Band Member
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1634
  • Karma: 230
  • Gender: Male
  • \,,/_(o-O)_,,i,.
    • Machinae Supremacy
Re: Rise of a Digital Nation: Reviews
« Reply #19 on: November 10, 2012, 01:33:01 am »
http://www.metal-observer.com/articles.php?lid=1&sid=1&id=19426

Some highlights:

/--- /... perhaps the most unique aspect of "Rise Of A Digital Nation" is the lyrics. It's been over a decade since the Web 2.0 revolution, and still we see plenty of songs about kids "lost in the cyberspace" when they "should be outside." MACHINAE SUPREMACY, on the other hand, recognizes the inherent beauty of millions of people simultaneously connecting from halfway across the globe, and they love waxing poetic about how social media and online gaming have created a sense of togetherness among the world's youth. "Rise Of A Digital Nation" is a paean to the power of the Internet and the generation that turned it into the immutable social and cultural force that it is today. It's not often that you see a band dedicated to the empowerment of video game culture, but perhaps MACHINAE SUPREMACY are more in tune with the digital world than most bands /---/


Every new MACHINAE SUPREMACY release is better than the last, so it's no surprise that "Rise Of A Digital Nation" is the band's best album to date. The more I think about this album, the less likely it seems like it should work; the dark, melancholy sound should contrast with the energetic, rebellious Punk message, but instead, they're perfectly balanced. Likewise, the 8-bit synths, which always sound far too peppy in modern Chiptune music, somehow manage to sound distant and cold in MACHINAE SUPREMACY's music, thus complementing the aforementioned grim atmosphere without disrupting the heaviness of the sound. The production and performances are slicker than they've ever been, the songs are the catchiest and heaviest they've ever written, and the overall sound remains impressively unique. "Rise Of A Digital Nation" will definitely be a hard act to top, but topping themselves appears to be MACHINAE SUPREMACY's speciality.



It's my job to keep SID elite.

---

<WereVolvo> you can't brain today, you have the dumb?

Offline robert

  • Baka
  • Band Member
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1634
  • Karma: 230
  • Gender: Male
  • \,,/_(o-O)_,,i,.
    • Machinae Supremacy
Re: Rise of a Digital Nation: Reviews
« Reply #20 on: November 11, 2012, 11:14:32 pm »


It's my job to keep SID elite.

---

<WereVolvo> you can't brain today, you have the dumb?

Offline Crazywater

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 962
  • Karma: 6
Re: Rise of a Digital Nation: Reviews
« Reply #21 on: November 12, 2012, 10:32:50 am »
http://www.time-for-metal.eu/include.php?path=article&contentid=6857

9/10

(any german, feel free to translate) :)

When I heard of Machinae Supremacy during my apprenticeship seven years ago, I was blown away by the genre mix the band offered in the "Webography" on their website as a free download. With songs like the cover of "I Turn To You", the remix of the soundtrack to the game "Gianna Sisters" or "Attack Music" I very quickly understood that the mixture of SID chip (sound chip of the Commodore 64) and Heavy Metal can work very well.

It wasn't only me who found out that this can work, but also several game producers: During the last years, Machinae Supremacy have been able to produce the soundtrack to the video games Jets'n'Guns, Bionic Commando and lastly the Poject Giana Game[sic].

Thus, the four Swedes happily continued to produce and put all their albums for free download on their website (Link: here). When in 2006 the Finnish label Spinefarm Records became aware of the SID metalers, this was the first step in the direction of real fame, and so Machinae Supremacy did what they could do best: Produce songs.

With Rise Of A Digital Nation, the fourth album under the umbrella of Spinefarm Records is released. The debut is made by the song All Of My Angels, which starts out very typically for Machinae Supremacy. The SID sounds introduce the first song of the album together with the lead guitar, just to grow into a more complex song.

Additionally there is good news about the singer's voice: Even if I always found it needs getting used to, the sound of Robert "Gaz" Stjärnström clings much more smoothly to the songs than it used to do. Almost spoken passages are also experimented with, which fit just as well as the normally sung parts.

Without exception the sophisticated guitar riffs built into the ten tracks of the album by Jonas "Gibli" Rörling know how to convince. What makes the album even a bit more worth listening are the guitar soli and interludes in every song that go into your ear without further ado.

The song Pieces reminds me of the soundtrack to Jets'n'Guns as it contains a melody arc in Commodore64 style and a very melodic guitar part.

Thematically, Machinae Supremacy stay with a digital Steampunk/Gaming world, which is described by the Digital Nation.

The finish of the album is made by the already in the "Webology" published song hero, which has received a facelift as well. It becomes obvious here that between the first release in 2001 and today a lot has changed for the band and today sound and mix are much more placed value on than eleven years ago.

Conclusion: Overall, the album is a positive step back to their roots because in my opinion the typical sound of the Commodore 64 in their last albums A View From The End Of The World (Release: 2010) and Overworld (Release: 2008) was cut back by a bit too much for my taste. Rise Of A Digital Nation is a milestone for the four Swedes in my opinion, because Machinae Supremacy somehow reinvent themselves and still stay completely true to themselves - who likes the band will love this album!

Listening tipps: Laser Speed Force, Republic Of Gamers and Hero

Rating: 9 of 10 points
We're open to such things, we've even talked many times about doing it with Inja, but in a way that's redundant because we can already get Erica
:o brown chicken brown cow :o

Offline JariWolf

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 337
  • Karma: 17
  • Gender: Male
  • Rabid MaSu fan wolf
    • Machine Animal @ Last.fm
Re: Rise of a Digital Nation: Reviews
« Reply #22 on: December 04, 2012, 05:32:19 pm »
Took a quick look at Inferno magazine in the store. 2/5 Something that you have ran out of passion and ideas and Pieces sounds like a pop punk band song. Probably same treatment from Soundi magazine. Both big Finnish magazines have hated your previous albums if I remember right. Anyway here's my translation of Kaaos Magazine review.

"There have been many unions of metal and electronic music but Swedish Machinae Supremacy take this completely to their own level. The band which was found with the inspiration from the SID-chip released their fourth album "Rise Of A Digital Nation" at the end of October. The band says the album contains less SID elements than previously and is made more in terms of what the music requires.

Having less SID in their music is slightly a two edged sword. The bands whole idea is based on them and surely some fans will be disappointed in this solution. In the other hand it could make the band more easy to approach to those who aren't so big fans of 8-bit sounds.

At first the album doesn't sound deep at all because the lyrics based on game worlds are a bit hard to take seriously. When the album opens up more you start to find quite Orwellian and dark lyrics which quite easily get lost under the cheerful melodies of the album.

The album opener "All Of My Angels" starts with SID sounds, at least it's not unclear what the album is about. Especially the songs in the end of the album "Republic of Gamers" and "Battlecry" have very dark lyrics. The song which comes after these "99" is a very interesting combination of angry lyrics and gentle melodies.

At least momentarily the vocalists nasal voice which is apparently used as a device to sound different annoys me massively. Fortunately it's not this gentlemans normal way to pronounce so it's tolerable and doesn't ruin the listening experience.

The albums ten songs form a whole which is under 45 minutes which feels shorter than it is. The songs are remarkably energetic and catchy. As a bottom line you could say the album is electronic party metal which works best as the soundtrack for nerd parties. For this 80's kid and a huge fan of the 8-bit Nintendo the music works great even though the SID-chip is from Commodore 64.

In the end "Rise Of A Digital Nation" suffers slightly from having all even headed songs and it makes you long for more attention grabbing elements like the SID-sound (with the exclusion of the singers nasal voice). As a party warm up music before going to the bar this music works for other than gamers as well if the SID sounds don't cause a disgust reaction."

7/10

Review by Nina Hurme

Translation by JariWolf 

http://kaaoszine.fi/machinae-supremacy-rise-digital-nation/

 
« Last Edit: December 04, 2012, 05:37:09 pm by JariWolf »

Offline The Bringer

  • "epic shirt guy" //dezo
  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 99
  • Karma: 0
  • Gender: Male
  • My Woo Style Goal is .. making a Video for MaSu
    • Krauthan-LoFF
Re: Rise of a Digital Nation: Reviews
« Reply #23 on: February 07, 2013, 04:25:30 am »
http://www.metal-observer.com/articles.php?lid=1&sid=1&id=19426

Some highlights:

/--- /... perhaps the most unique aspect of "Rise Of A Digital Nation" is the lyrics. It's been over a decade since the Web 2.0 revolution, and still we see plenty of songs about kids "lost in the cyberspace" when they "should be outside." MACHINAE SUPREMACY, on the other hand, recognizes the inherent beauty of millions of people simultaneously connecting from halfway across the globe, and they love waxing poetic about how social media and online gaming have created a sense of togetherness among the world's youth. "Rise Of A Digital Nation" is a paean to the power of the Internet and the generation that turned it into the immutable social and cultural force that it is today. It's not often that you see a band dedicated to the empowerment of video game culture, but perhaps MACHINAE SUPREMACY are more in tune with the digital world than most bands /---/


Every new MACHINAE SUPREMACY release is better than the last, so it's no surprise that "Rise Of A Digital Nation" is the band's best album to date. The more I think about this album, the less likely it seems like it should work; the dark, melancholy sound should contrast with the energetic, rebellious Punk message, but instead, they're perfectly balanced. Likewise, the 8-bit synths, which always sound far too peppy in modern Chiptune music, somehow manage to sound distant and cold in MACHINAE SUPREMACY's music, thus complementing the aforementioned grim atmosphere without disrupting the heaviness of the sound. The production and performances are slicker than they've ever been, the songs are the catchiest and heaviest they've ever written, and the overall sound remains impressively unique. "Rise Of A Digital Nation" will definitely be a hard act to top, but topping themselves appears to be MACHINAE SUPREMACY's speciality.

Probably the best Review, imho.

Just what i would´ve written.
I really like this Album and its catchy Refrains.
Each Song is different and shows how inovative your Style is.
Thank you for your work, keep rockin

Piet
Hope the new avatar is OK :-/
C64 rulez,
MaSu rockz!
Yahtah!

Offline Ageless

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 90
  • Karma: 1
  • Gender: Male
  • There can only be one SID
Re: Rise of a Digital Nation: Reviews
« Reply #24 on: February 09, 2013, 02:05:37 pm »
http://www.sputnikmusic.com/review/53875/Machinae-Supremacy-Rise-of-a-Digital-Nation/

Snippet:
Quote
Machinae Supremacy’s Rise of a Digital Nation is a thundering opus for a young and pissed off generation. While many are in love with the band’s underground roots and the popularity that it has engendered among gamers, their music is a unique experience and Rise of a Digital Nation is an album worthy of a listen.

4.0  excellent

http://www.metal-temple.com/site/catalogues/entry/reviews/cd_3/m_2/machinae-supremacy.htm

Snippet:
Quote
A computerized world, the dominance of mankind is fading as the power of the machines rise. Can we accept that? To be controlled by our very own creations? Are we too old to handle anymore? Do we need to be the characters we are playing in the various computer games we admire?

6/10, has potential

http://axisofmetal.com/2012/10/machinae-supremacy-rise-of-a-digital-nation-review/

Snippet:
Quote
Once again I find myself in the company of these Swedes who have long since been on my radar, each time played regularly before steadily dropping back down to the forgetful recesses of my mind. They’ve been sticking to their winning formula for years; a catchy riff for the verse, slow it down for the chorus, throw in a solo and you’re done.

8/10

http://www.themonolith.com/music/machinae-supremacy-rise-of-a-digital-nation/

Snippet:
Quote
Without meaning to dash the hopes of the virtuosic enthusiasts and those that crave complexity, Rise of a Digital Nation is a very easy album. Many of the songs on the record have a very radio-friendly quality to them – this is meant in a positive way, honestly.

68%
« Last Edit: February 09, 2013, 02:19:35 pm by Ageless »
Jord