Author Topic: Gamer's Logic  (Read 2615 times)

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Offline Sirix

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Gamer's Logic
« on: February 04, 2009, 02:10:16 am »
I wrote this on my blog recently
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Often, when developing a game, the creators have to take into mind what I like to call “Unnecessary Realism”. There are moments inside games that would, quite simply, be annoying if they were to follow the rules of the real world. To a gamer, reloading your gun in an FPS is perfectly acceptable and, indeed, considered a good move if you get a free chance regardless of how much ammo is left in your gun. However, it might seem to an inexperienced on-looker that the player is removing the clip with their remaining bullets and refreshing with a new one. Of course, we know that we are only reloading the missing bullets and that the animation of changing clips is for flavor.

I was watching my roommate play through The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess on the Wii. She completed a puzzle that was necessary to advance and she was high up in a room and then began to walk back down to the bottom to continue her task. “Why didn’t she just jump down?” I thought to myself. It was clearly much faster. She seemed absolutely shocked that I had considered throwing poor Link off the 30 foot cliff. Again, real-world logic is interfering with efficient game-playing here. On the one, realistic hand, yes… throwing Link off the cliff is quite cruel. On the other hand, you’re only going to lose 1 of what was currently 7 hearts because of this. When you have to play through what will end up being a 40+ hour adventure, cutting corners like this becomes second nature.

Inexperienced gamers also seem to be under the impression that anything “secret” should be a secret to everyone—without any hint at all. But once again, that would be quite simply frustrating and so developers give us helpful hints. Again, while watching my room mate play Zelda, I voiced my concern when she ran right past a secret area. She backed up and looked around but was confused. All she could find was rocks. Ah, but the rocks were formed in a circle, I pointed out. Still confused, she didn’t seem to understand that this wasn’t a natural formation. “Go back and spin in a circle counterclockwise with your red clothes on! It’s so obvious!” I exclaim.
Finally, she performs the spin and, sure enough, a secret room lay hidden. (note: there is, of course, no secret in Twilight Princess where you have to spin counter-clockwise with red clothes on. You can’t spin counter-clockwise and there are no red clothes to be worn! I take the liberty of invention in my blog!)

We, as gamers, can notice when something is out of place. We recognize that the world we are playing in is programmed and that if there is something that doesn’t fit the formula, it’s either a glitch or a deliberate change. We have developed a fine tuned ability to recognize what is deliberate and what isn’t. If we come across a slightly discolored or rounded rock, our instant reaction is to blow it up with whatever means necessary. Our eyes are constantly scanning trees, bushes, houses and the like for the slightest irregularity so we can unleash our full arsenal until a satisfying chime indicates that we’ve discovered a secret.

I'd very much like to hear other people's ideas for "Gamer's Logic"

feel free to post comments on the post at my blog as well (link in my signature)

Offline Cerapter

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Re: Gamer's Logic
« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2009, 11:09:01 pm »
My little cousin is good at such logic. Kids pick it up quickly. He'll go off on explanations like

"No, that was a purple coin, so we have to pull the rope twice and then you got to be the guy with the thing on his head 'cause he can hit fire."

We got to have some kind of Gamer's Logic, because we can't reproduce reality. However, there are many games that would like to be as intuitive as possible, removing as much of the game's seperate logic and thus the need to learn new stuff. This is real hard, I suppose, perhaps as challenging as making realistic graphics. And perhaps just as needless, depending on the game.

Then we got the games who accept that they are seperate worlds with logics of their own. There are two ways to deal with this, the way I see it:

A) Is the logic the very point if the game? You might have a Brain Training-esque game in your hands. The game teaches you to challenge your mind in new ways, and learn abstract thought the fun way.

B) Is knowledge of the logic a requisite? I think this is the case with Zelda. You're a hardcore gamer, you already know the drill, you know what Link can do, the logic is old to you, and the game isn't going to explain it to you. It is kind of elitist, actually, and the mainstream market will fear it.

If you don't want to learn anything new and just have a good time, then Gamer's Logic is bad. Not everyone wants to grow up to become mathematicians or philosophers. But if you like abstract thought and putting yourself in strange, challenging situations, then Gamer's Logic can make up the very essence of a game.

That's my 2 cents.
Just close your eyes and keep your mind wide open.

Offline Jack Lupino

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Re: Gamer's Logic
« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2009, 11:17:13 pm »
Its the kind of awareness you create, see beyond the world of polygons, the architecture of bytes and code.

Offline WereVolvo

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Re: Gamer's Logic
« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2009, 11:21:09 pm »
Its the kind of awareness you create, see beyond the world of polygons, the architecture of bytes and code.

That was either profoundly deep or just superficial gibberish, and I'm not sure which :P
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Offline Gravehill

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Re: Gamer's Logic
« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2009, 11:52:55 pm »
Gamers logic

World is done of tubes. Tubes start where you first reach awareness and in the other end of tube there's reward. So in the matter of fact you are bit like rat in maze. You know that maze is done of tubes and you are not interested why the maze is there and how, you're just interested of that cheese on the other end of maze.

You know that in reality you can climb over tree stump that reaches your kneelevel but in alternative reality it's a dead end. If there seems to be somekind of obstacle that's quite conveniently blocking your way it means that's the end of reality. Sometimes you feel urge to go through or pass those invisible or ridiculous obstacles just to see if there's something hidden there... Or if you can do something that programmer, level designer or game testers have not invented and so create bizarre situations. Like for example get stuck on walls or disappear altogether inside ground and there's only boot visible on the ground. That's not fail, it's winning situation. You've breached that barrier and went through the gates of designed reality. It feels good.

In games when you meet obstacle you usually use more and more force until you're through. If force doesn't help you use even more force. If it doesn't help you cry. Sometimes you must think or you just have to do something precisely right in pixel level. It's always fun. Gameworld consist of bad characters, obstacles. No matter whether you drive car, jump around in platforms or shoot your way through hell (I say HELL!) all other active things, alive or not, they are obstacles. You must win them. It's fight of the fittest all the time in the gameworld.

In the game world no matter what you do you either get punished or rewarded. It's the name of the game. You obey to game designers will and do what he/she thinks is right to get rewards and avoid penalties. Beating game is fun but usually when you've done so you've not won the game designer but he has won you. You've done just what he wants. That's why game designer is god (I say GOD!).

No matter what one thinks about games one thing is for certain. Game designers know how to talk with our primitive insticts. They know we want to survive, we want satisfaction, we want sex, we want speed and we want violence. Playing games feels good because in game world everything's so extreme. Even boobs, most of the time.
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Offline Cerapter

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Re: Gamer's Logic
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2009, 01:53:43 am »
There's one thing I don't like about Game Logic, and that's boxes. Not that you get useful things from smashing a box once in a while, but those times when you reap the biggest award for smashing everything and spending ages more on the game doing it. In the end you've created a neurosis making you incapable of not smashing a box when you see it.

Speaking of neuroses, I also don't like the way some people learn the game logic very well, and proceed to cut as many corners as possible, just because they can, because they know the game that well. Like those who just have to cancel every cutscene and replay, and press the next button like mad when somebody's talking.

Sometimes it's nice to remember that it's just a game, and the logic you primarily follow is the one of the real world.
Just close your eyes and keep your mind wide open.

Offline L'homme magique

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Re: Gamer's Logic
« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2009, 07:24:15 am »
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Like those who just have to cancel every cutscene and replay, and press the next button like mad when somebody's talking.

Sometimes it's nice to remember that it's just a game, and the logic you primarily follow is the one of the real world.
i play games to play them, not listen to some hippie shouting about the evil empire that's gonna suck the planet dry.
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Offline Jack Lupino

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Re: Gamer's Logic
« Reply #7 on: February 05, 2009, 04:07:01 pm »
Its the kind of awareness you create, see beyond the world of polygons, the architecture of bytes and code.

That was either profoundly deep or just superficial gibberish, and I'm not sure which :P
it was deep gotdamnit

Offline Sirix

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Re: Gamer's Logic
« Reply #8 on: February 05, 2009, 04:18:16 pm »
There's one thing I don't like about Game Logic, and that's boxes.

I hate when a game gives you endless boxes/urns/whateverthefuck to break, so you ALWAYS break everything in hopes of finding treasure... but sometimes there is no fucking treasure.

I've broken a lot of empty god damn boxes in my gaming life.

Quote from: gravehill
No matter what one thinks about games one thing is for certain. Game designers know how to talk with our primitive insticts. They know we want to survive, we want satisfaction, we want sex, we want speed and we want violence. Playing games feels good because in game world everything's so extreme. Even boobs, most of the time.

One thing I've always said to people who say something as naive as "that doesn't make any sense" while watching me play a game is "THAT'S THE FUCKING POINT!"

One quote I love from an unknown source is "Novels let us imagine the impossible, movies let us see the impossible, games let us do the impossible."

I have generally not been a fan of any game that is too realistic (sports games, race car games, etc). Take those games and add a touch of "wtf" and you've got a good game. Mario Sports games or F-zero, for example.

The more impossible a game is and the better a developer pulls off that level of impossibility in a convincing way, the better a game is, IMO

Offline Ant

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Re: Gamer's Logic
« Reply #9 on: February 05, 2009, 05:10:07 pm »
My logic for gaming is to take each seperate game as its own, individual, seperate universe.

Doing this when faced with a question such as "Jump off the 30ft drop or take the stairs?" allows me to then think "Well, I know the stairs are going to get me where I want to go safely, but then I'll never know if Link can do the jump and I'm pretty sure I'll be faced with an oppurtunity like this again" so take the jump and test the laws of physics and my characters hardiness at the same time, if I die... oh well there's a save function like in many, many games and I will have learnt a little more about the universe this game was created in and how far I can push it.

Also, breaking into people's houses in RPG games is hilarious and is a required thing to do, making it more hilarious
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Offline L'homme magique

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Re: Gamer's Logic
« Reply #10 on: February 05, 2009, 07:55:48 pm »
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good game. Mario Sports games
dohohoho

Also, one thing i love about the metal gear solid games is how well it handles the gameworld. like, not only do characters tell you to "press the action button" to do things, but there's also stuff like... in MGS, if you beat the game and save meryl then you get the infinite ammo bandana for your next playthrough. in MGS2, when raiden meets up with snake after being naked for a while he goes "do you have enough ammo?"

"absolutely." *points at bandana* "infinite ammo!"

and then there's the bit in MGS3 where you get the Patriot (the one-of-a-kind handgun held only by the (final) boss) at the start of a new game, and if you call your tech support he asks how you even got a hold of it.
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Offline Einkoro

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Re: Gamer's Logic
« Reply #11 on: February 05, 2009, 09:48:49 pm »
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good game. Mario Sports games
dohohoho

Also, one thing i love about the metal gear solid games is how well it handles the gameworld. like, not only do characters tell you to "press the action button" to do things, but there's also stuff like... in MGS, if you beat the game and save meryl then you get the infinite ammo bandana for your next playthrough. in MGS2, when raiden meets up with snake after being naked for a while he goes "do you have enough ammo?"

"absolutely." *points at bandana* "infinite ammo!"

and then there's the bit in MGS3 where you get the Patriot (the one-of-a-kind handgun held only by the (final) boss) at the start of a new game, and if you call your tech support he asks how you even got a hold of it.

And here I thought you only liked it because you get to run around naked.
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Offline Sirix

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Re: Gamer's Logic
« Reply #12 on: February 06, 2009, 05:53:30 pm »
Also, breaking into people's houses in RPG games is hilarious and is a required thing to do, making it more hilarious

This is becoming less and less common!

Not many modern RPGs allow blatant breaking and entering.