Author Topic: Music Recording - DIY Style  (Read 38175 times)

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Offline megashroom°

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Re: Music Recording - DIY Style
« Reply #60 on: January 06, 2008, 10:06:40 pm »
Thanx a lot sir Radicz0r.
Might try it.


I am thinking of getting a Line 6 TonePort. It seems to spare a lot of heavy preparation. And as proved you can get some badass sounds out of it, I am thinking of the guitar sounds on Hubnester - Samurai Soul Hunters (if they now used GP for that one) and Gimme More.

But is there any other manufacturer of amp emulation stuff that is worth checking out. Or is Line 6 completely the best?

Offline Jack Lupino

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Re: Music Recording - DIY Style
« Reply #61 on: January 06, 2008, 11:06:06 pm »
Ofcourse not.
Boss, Korg, Roland.. to name a few.

 

Offline grey

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Re: Music Recording - DIY Style
« Reply #62 on: July 13, 2008, 08:44:39 pm »
gt-10 vs line 6 pod xt live - which one would you choose?  ::)

Offline megashroom°

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Re: Music Recording - DIY Style
« Reply #63 on: July 14, 2008, 12:06:55 am »
gt-10 vs line 6 pod xt live - which one would you choose?  ::)

GT-10 is better :).
XT Live has been around for a few years now, and is like as good as GT-8.
The Line 6 challenger to BOSS GT-10 is Line 6 X3.

Offline Blue Devil

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Re: Music Recording - DIY Style
« Reply #64 on: July 26, 2008, 06:26:41 am »
Personally, I use a Line6 Guitarport, but instead of using the Cabinet simulator that comes with it, I use a program called Guitar Rig 3 by Native Instruments.  It costs some extra cash, but it's entirely worth it. I can't even go back to the original Guitarport program without feeling restricted by it.

Offline megashroom°

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Re: Music Recording - DIY Style
« Reply #65 on: July 26, 2008, 09:22:45 pm »
Personally, I use a Line6 Guitarport, but instead of using the Cabinet simulator that comes with it, I use a program called Guitar Rig 3 by Native Instruments.  It costs some extra cash, but it's entirely worth it. I can't even go back to the original Guitarport program without feeling restricted by it.

I've tested both Guitar Rig 3 and Gearbox. To me Gearbox sounds far more realiastic.
The only thing I use is Guitar Rig 3 for is making cool sound effects. It has some awsome effects stuff :).

Lysix

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Re: Music Recording - DIY Style
« Reply #66 on: July 27, 2008, 09:18:17 pm »
just acquired guitar rig 3. thanks for mentioning it [:

Offline H

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Re: Music Recording - DIY Style
« Reply #67 on: August 31, 2010, 01:33:45 am »
Ok, I feel I need to contribute this to anyone who is doing home recording & don't have real drums on hand. Something that seems to work for me pretty well & I've had fantastic results so far.

Ok, so.

Raise your hand if you have a drum program. Any one at all. *raises hand* Good ;D

In my case....don't laugh.....I'm using a horribly OLD....OLD....OLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLD....drum program DEMO...Fruity Loops PRO 2.54. We're talking ancient here.

Why am using this? I'm familiar with it, I didn't have to buy it, it doesn't expire, & I don't have any way to torrent anything else (that & I refuse to....even tho I'd love something that SAVES what the fuck I'm working on....not to mention video editing software....but I digress) :p

Anyway, Robert was correct in saying that anything you record yourself should be Mono. Bass, guitars, vocals, every'ting.

But the drums.....

....well, let's just say that, unless you have the capability to record multiple tracks all at once (ie more than 8, 10, 12, 16, etc), & are able to dedicate a single track for your digital drums (hi hat, bass kick, snare, toms, cymbols, etc etc etc), you're probably not going to want to make any part of the drums Mono.

So what to do?

Well, in my case, since I have a shit program, I set my digital kit up well in advance. I make a track, get the beats/fills/patterns excatly how I like them, & then I careful adjust the volume of each piece of the kit (while still in the drum program), paying as much attention as humanly possible to make sure not a single piece of my kit is too loud/too soft/oddly placed in the sound spectrum. I make heavy use of the stereo capabilites within the drum program to make sure every piece sounds exactly where I want it.

It's a ton of effort, but it's worth it.

Then, once I'm happy with how it sounds, I export/save the .wav file. Normally, it defaults to Mono while saving, but I check the Stereo option (or Uncheck the Mono option in your program) to make sure that the sound of my digital kit is preserved.

Then, I take my drum track into my recording program.

In my program (Cakewalk guitar tracks), I get an option called "Stereo Split" when I import a .wav file. I love this option, because it not only preserves the stereo sound of my kit when I load it, but it loads the track hard left & hard right.

MEANING that no matter where in the mix I record everything (dead center, mid left, mid right, etc), it isn't stepping on the toes of the drum track, meaning that the full sound of the kit is preserved quite well. :)

If you don't get an option in your program like stereo split (or if your stereo drums are jammed into a single track instead of 2), you may be able to use an editing program like Goldwave or something to rip the track in 2, & save them drums_L & drums_R. Then you can put them into your recording program in 2 different tracks to get that stereo feel back.

*checks Goldwave*

Yup, you can. :)


Now I'm sure all of you guys have better EVERYTHING than me (drum progs, recording progs, guitars, mixing progs, etc) but this has been working for me quite weill lately. And since I'm limited to only 8 tracks with my recording program, having the other 6 tracks free to record everything else (while still having every single piece of my digital kit) is quite awsome. ;D



Hopefully this helps someone. If not, feel free to tell me I'm wrong, I suck, & all that jazz. :p
« Last Edit: August 31, 2010, 01:40:04 am by H »
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Offline Jack Lupino

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Re: Music Recording - DIY Style
« Reply #68 on: September 08, 2010, 03:06:31 pm »
You see a lot of people cling to their setups, as guitar players always have some sort of "safety blanket" always bitching about 'their sound' and whatnot, i find it a lot more fun to try out new stuff everytime until i find something that suits me, and actually SOUNDS BETTER.

Right now i'm running Cubase SX3, Superior Drummer 2.0, Programmed in Fruityloops 9 XXXL Studio, record guitars with a Line 6 UX2 Studio Pod, And record vocals with my condensator MLX Mic. I run my mixes through audition 3.0 since it has one of the most powerful compression methods i've come across and for further tinkering it's just an accesible program with nice shortcuts ^_^

First: Lets look over some critical 'dirt guitar' EQ ranges and how they affect the myriad of choices/possibilities we might wish to examine in our undertaking. Bottom to top.

20-45Hz.    Never say never. Just say rarely.
50-90hz    Ahh the madness. Here's the 'swing' range in our 'chugging'.
100-150    Bottom of the meat.
180-240    Lo-Center of the meat.
250-320    Hi-Center of the meat.
340-650    Danger Will Robinson. Top of meat/Bottom of mids. CRITICAL.
700-900    More danger. Hard to hear. Kills 'newbies' on contact. Will explain.
950-1.2k    Pure Satan. Make or break ya. Easy to hear. Hard to control.
1.3k-1.6k    Ditto the above.
1.7k-2.2k    Top of the mids/Bottom of pick attack range. Oh, the fear.
2.3k-3.1k    Middle of pick range. Picky de poison. Mucho Satania.
3.2k-4.2k    Top of pick range. Pick out a nice coffin. Yer gonna need it.
4.3k-6.5k    Bottom of fizz. Add Beefeaters for gin fizz. Guzzle many glasses.
6.6k-8k.    Top of fizzy. Many will kill this range ruthlessly. Careful. Can O' wormies.
8k-10k    Road to hell. Paved with good intentions. Enjoy. Not.
10-15k    Less obvious road(s) to hell. Gravel. Lose a windshield up here.
15k-25k    Same disclaimer as 25-40Hz. Can you say 'sometimes bandwidth matters'?

OK. DISCLAIMER TIME FOR "OLD GUYS". I'm describing the Grand Canyon. We both know it. Can't REALLY be done.

Gimmie some rope and I'll hang myself impressively. Stop laughing, you pricks.
By the way fellas, we're STILL tracking. It's gonna get WORSE in mix.

Let's just talk about EQ APPROACHES.

Schools of thought.

School 1: Capture it ALL.
School 2: Capture it ALL but capture LESS of what yer pretty sure yer not going to use much of later.
School 3: Capture MOSTLY what you want with a TINY nod to the wacky shit.
School 4: Fuck everyone. Capture ONLY what you like. HAMMER the fuck out of everything else.
School 5: Shit pants in terror. Return to recording rap with SP1200.