Author Topic: The underworld of MMORPGs?  (Read 2606 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Spiff

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 642
  • Karma: 22
The underworld of MMORPGs?
« on: July 07, 2005, 04:00:20 pm »
http://www.1up.com/do/feature?cId=3141815

I thought it was an interesting read. Makes me wonder whether those "druid macro farms" in Tibia are actually controlled by something like these examples - after all, there are way too few Gamemasters in that game to barely control anything, and you don't even have to pay to create a limitless number of characters, if one happens to get banned.

It's incredible how much people over the world are willing to pay for something that, despite having been generated by hours of hard work, is completely fictional, virtual gold that is nothing more than numbers stored in a variable on a server, in a game created by a programmer. It's like spending hours every day doing absolutely nothing, yet making money out of thin air. What if the server crashes or someone tampers with the amount of gold on it? Virtual money that disappears or changes drastically in value, yet affects real-world economy, and can get people in poor countries jobs as computer slaves. Weird... to say the least.

I suppose it's not as weird when you look at what other completely useless and fictional things people pay for in the world, like computer software. But, the difference is that this is like a sweatshop where corporations make money in ways that were never intended, and illegal according to the terms of use set forth by the game maker, though arguably it's not very hard work according to the article. I guess... it puts alot of things in perspective, if you think about it long enough. And if there's a way to make money, people are going to use it.

chompy

  • Guest
Re: The underworld of MMORPGs?
« Reply #1 on: July 07, 2005, 04:29:55 pm »
*yawn* have had this discussion today and previously - multiple times.

A few things to point out; from the article the total earnings of the gaming farms seem to fake to be true. For example don't you think some people from developed countries with time on their hands sell their own gold trying to max out their monthly income. Heck I would do it for a period of time if I was making alot of money in total.

The pictures in the article of the farms; also seem a bit off, I don't think they could afford such setups such as using the LCD monitors as displayed. I would imagine a bare minimum setup focusing on space more then anything with el 'cheapo crt monitors on the side.

As for the mass game farming in general I look down on it. I would not and will not purchase anything to do with it online and I wont recommend anyoneelse to. I wish game companies should take a tougher stance on farming although they can only do so much up until a point.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2005, 04:32:30 pm by chompy »

Offline Spiff

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 642
  • Karma: 22
Re: The underworld of MMORPGs?
« Reply #2 on: July 07, 2005, 07:11:12 pm »
So you're saying that the article is fake and excaggerated? I thought 1UP had a better reputation for gaming than that, but I dunno. It's not that this article shocks me or anything, like they say, the work is easy and can't be compared to many other similar things. But it's not alien to me to think that someone would group together a bunch of cheap people to make money for them, way more money than they could make themselves this way. I was more pointing out the usage of this "tactic" on online games, rather than the numbers and statistics; how odd of a concept it is.

chompy

  • Guest
Re: The underworld of MMORPGs?
« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2005, 06:09:55 am »
Not at all, I do believe that there are underground game farming happening all around the world. What I was refering to was the amount of profits that are actually made from doing this. It does not feel accurate, I don't believe they are making the amount of money they are stating. Which brings me to a point; why don't more gamers do this themselves if it brings them x amount of money per month, if it is so profitable.

Offline Spiff

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 642
  • Karma: 22
Re: The underworld of MMORPGs?
« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2005, 12:56:35 pm »
Well, my friend sold a high-level Tibia character for about a thousand Kronor to someone he knew. Whenever a new server pops up, some poeple use multi-clienting start powerleveling and botting like crazy, reaching level 100+ in record time, and some sell these characters to people who want to have an advantage on the new servers. The downside is of course that client shared characters are often banned, you just have to look at their 24-hours-a-day online time. :p

But you're right about the numbers, after all, bots and specific game hacking software shouldn't be that hard to find for free on the internet. The various exploits and macros for Tibia can presumably be found everywhere. I'm still sure a single person could make a living on farming with his own network of computers though. It's pretty common to walk down the road in Tibia and see a mage sitting perfectly still, throwing out his fishing rod a few hundred times per second into the water, catching mountains of fish. But if no-one's watching the macro, you can just stand there and eat his fish... :)

Offline Jack Lupino

  • Worst Dude
  • Machinae Prime
  • *****
  • Posts: 12941
  • Karma: 62
  • Gender: Female
Re: The underworld of MMORPGs?
« Reply #5 on: July 08, 2005, 05:59:09 pm »
its true. there was an article in the newspaper about that too.

It said that the younger generation now can be who they want to be in a computer game, and they pay money for it, so its basically like a drug.

And they also made a statement about that over 30 years everybody will be addicted to those games and blablabla..

Offline Turtle

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 696
  • Karma: 10
  • Gender: Male
  • I'm a turtle!
    • Turtle's Site
Re: The underworld of MMORPGs?
« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2005, 03:56:40 am »
Interesting article.  I did a research paper on something like this a while back.  My teacher had no idea what I was talking about.  I tried explaining it to her, but I think the concept of people "playing games" on a computer was a bit much for her to handle.  Still got a decent grade on it at least.